Reds ace Trevor Bauer says the shortened MLB season 'better than the alternative, which is not playing'

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Cincinnati Reds pitcher Trevor Bauer told "Bill Hemmer Reports" Monday that he was excited about the shortened 2020 Major League Baseball season, despite the "horrible" safety regulations imposed by the league.

"I want to go out there and compete," Bauer said. "I think we all really want to go out and compete, provide entertainment for fans and do what we love to do. We all have missed it."

MLB PLANES A SHORTEST 60 GAME BOARD SINCE 1878, AS UNION BALKS

Each MLB club will play a regular 60-game season, with the opening day set for July 23 or 24. Clubs must submit a written COVID-19 action plan for league approval, while players, umpires, and other personnel on the field are told to practice physical distancing as much as possible. In addition, spitting in dressing rooms, canoes, and in the fields is prohibited.

"It sounds horrible," said Bauer. "It is not what we are used to. You sit on the bench with people, eating sunflower seeds, chewing gum, shocking those five and all that. We are going to have to be much more aware this year. But," he emphasized , "It is better than the alternative, which is not playing."

Bauer, who is entering his ninth major league season and his first full season with the Reds, said the team is "excited to go out and abide by the rules as much as humanly possible to be safe … while not yet take away nothing. " of the competitive nature of the game and trying to win. "

When asked by host Bill Hemmer about MLB's handling of the pandemic, Bauer, who has been a vocal during the Major League Baseball Players Association fight with team owners for compensation for the shortened season , said host Bill Hemmer that it was a "loaded question".

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"There are many different aspects to consider," he said. "I think public negotiation is part of this … it immediately changed the health and safety conversation to the dollar amount. It wasn't even a proposal. It was strictly to judge public sentiment and pit fans against players."

"I don't know of any other business that intentionally creates a gap between its customer base and its product," he said. "It does not make any sense."

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